Blog

MAY
25
2016

Values for Old Books

By mwilcox

Grant

Values for books depends a great deal on the following three things, 'Edition, Author and Condition'. The general guideline, with some exceptions of course, being that first editions of a book in very good condition by a famous Author are most sought after and more valuable compared to later editions in poorer condition. An exception that would exceed this general rule could be a rather common book in poor condition, but bearing the signature of a famous/Infamous former owner such as a General Grant or a Jesse James type. Antiquarian Booksellers have guidelines for book condition that they use in their listings, there are some variences , but they generally are as follows...

“As New”: Means just that; flawless right from the store.

“Fine“: Close to the condition “As New,” but not as crisp. Still, there must also be no defects.

“Very Good“: Describes a used book with some small signs of wear but no rips or tears on either binding or paper.
Any defects will be noted in the description.

“Good“: An average used and worn book that still has all pages or leaves. Any defects will be noted in the description.

“Fair“: Describes a worn book that has complete text pages including maps or plates, but may be missing end papers.
The binding will generally be worn in spots, and any defects will be noted in the description.

“Poor“: A book that is so worn that its only rates as a reading copy with a complete text, but it could have missing maps
or plates, exhibit loose joints or bindings. These examples also tend to be scuffed or stained, and any defects will be
noted in the description.

“Ex-library“: Former library books must always be listed as such no matter what the condition of the book. Any defects
will be noted in the description.

“Binding Copy“: Is a book in which the pages are perfect, but there could be damage to the binding or the binding
could be missing

“Book Club“: Editions are always listed as such regardless of the condition of the book.